Personal constructs lead to misjudges.

Updated: Jan 14, 2021

Kelly's personal construct theory defines a person's experience of the world as an organized and unique set of personal constructs (Funder,2016). Meaning your experience of the world is perceived by individual concepts and perspectives of the world. Your view of the world will differ depending on how much you allow your theories to control what you see. Therefore, agreeance and confidence is the position of this theory. Strongly supporting the concept of personal constructs and how our construals define our view of the world and our experience, Life has been subjected to personal construct and bias experiences in the world. As a minority, Kelly's theory has helped to understand why feelings I feel around others.


Like Leitner (2019), people have an opportunity to be less evil with proper implementation of the personal construct theory. This implementation can lead to a change in behavior in the world. If we can change our constructs, we can resolve more peaceful and thoughtful solutions to our problems. For example, an individual's personal opinions of other races would no longer determine an individual's behavior during an experience. There would be a conscious awareness of thought and informed action when creating experiences. Mullineux et al. (2019) provide some validity and accuracy to the theory by eliciting re-offending judgments made by probation officers' personal constructs and social workers. If this same study were used to establish an understanding of behavior and prevent re-offense, it would be used for the greater good.


Funder, D. C. (2016). The personality puzzle (8th ed.). New York, NY: W. W. Norton & Company.

Leitner, L. M. (2019). Evil and Justice: An Experiential Personal Construct Approach. Journal of Constructivist Psychology, 32(1), 33–47. https://doi-org.ezproxy.snhu.edu/10.1080/10720537.2017.1350610

Mullineux, J. C., Taylor, B. J., & Giles, M. L. (2019). Probation officers' judgments: A study using personal construct theory. Journal of Social Work, 19(1), 41–59. https://doi-org.ezproxy.snhu.edu/10.1177/1468017318757384







11 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All